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Thursday, September 21, 2017

Lakmé ♪ Léo Delibes - "Sous le dôme épais"

Léo Delibes
"Sous le dôme épais"
Lakmé




The "Flower Duet" (French: Duo des fleurs / Sous le dôme épais) is a famous duet for sopranos from Léo Delibes' opera Lakmé, first performed in Paris in 1883. The duet takes place in act 1 of the three-act opera, between characters Lakmé, the daughter of a Brahmin priest, and her servant Mallika, as they go to gather flowers by a river.

The duet is frequently used in advertisements and films and is popular as a concert piece. It was adapted for the track "Aria" in the British Airways "face" advertisements of the 1980s by Yanni and Malcolm McLaren.



Natalie Dessay & Delphine Haidan 
"Flower duet" from Lakme

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

This Will NOT End Well !!

Kim Jong Un Insulted Donald Trump
And Taught America A New Word at The Same Time
By Ed Mazza
Kim Jong Un calls Trump a mentally deranged U.S. dotard.  
Searches for 'dotard' are high as a kite.
 https://68.media.tumblr.com/2d5bef0ecc04e9b9ad28e65076d29e58/tumblr_owink89Rqo1vprwrro1_540.jpg https://68.media.tumblr.com/943c6edd76c935199522466097ae5d33/tumblr_owink89Rqo1vprwrro4_r1_540.gif
The international community has watched in dismay as U.S. President Donald Dotard Trump and North Korean leader Rocket Man Kim Jong Un trade escalating taunts and insults. 
On Thursday evening, days after Trump threatened to “totally destroy” North Korea, Pyongyang responded by warning it might detonate a hydrogen bomb.

Here’s what “dotard” means.
Definition of DOTARD: a person in his or her dotage (a state or period of senile decay marked by decline of mental poise and alertness)
Trump called Kim Jong Un “rocket man” earlier this week, and now the North Korean dictator has returned fire.

Kim gave Trump a nickname of his own - and it’s one that sent Americans scrambling for a dictionary.

“I will surely and definitely tame the mentally deranged dotard with fire,” Kim said in a statement released by the North Korean government Thursday. 

While the statement was full of choice words for Trump - calling him “unfit,” “rogue” and “gangster” - it was the word “dotard,” used twice, that seemed to catch everyone’s attention. 

According to Merriam-Webster, a “dotard” is a “person in his or her dotage,” with “dotage” further defined as “a state or period of senile decay marked by decline of mental poise and alertness.”

Freelance journalist Jihye Lee said the original statement in Korean used a term better translated as “old beast lunatic,” but it became “dotard” in the English version released by North Korea. 
The statement caused the word “dotard” to trend on Twitter.
https://68.media.tumblr.com/99170386e401291e2929ee09b31b30e4/tumblr_owink89Rqo1vprwrro5_r1_1280.jpg
The international community has watched in dismay as U.S. President Donald Dotard Trump and North Korean leader “Rocket Man” Kim Jong Un trade escalating taunts and insults. 
On Thursday evening, days after Trump threatened to “totally destroy” North Korea, Pyongyang responded by warning it might detonate a hydrogen bomb.

Here’s what “dotard” means.
Definition of DOTARD: a person in his or her dotage (a state or period of senile decay marked by decline of mental poise and alertness)
Trump called Kim Jong Un “rocket man” earlier this week, and now the North Korean dictator has returned fire.

Kim gave Trump a nickname of his own ― and it’s one that sent Americans scrambling for a dictionary.

“I will surely and definitely tame the mentally deranged dotard with fire,” Kim said in a statement released by the North Korean government Thursday. 

While the statement was full of choice words for Trump ― calling him “unfit,” “rogue” and “gangster” - it was the word “dotard,” used twice, that seemed to catch everyone’s attention. 

According to Merriam-Webster, a “dotard” is a “person in his or her dotage,” with “dotage” further defined as “a state or period of senile decay marked by decline of mental poise and alertness.”

Freelance journalist Jihye Lee said the original statement in Korean used a term better translated as “old beast lunatic,” but it became “dotard” in the English version released by North Korea. 
The statement caused the word “dotard” to trend on Twitter.
What You Need To Know About North Korea’s Threat To Detonate An H-Bomb In The Pacific
The consequences could be devastating, experts warn.

By Jesselyn Cook
While provocative rhetoric is not uncommon from North Korea, expert observers of that isolated nation warn that such a statement should not be taken lightly. It comes just weeks after the country conducted its sixth and most powerful nuclear test to date, triggering sanctions and fierce condemnation from the United Nations Security Council.
Analysts estimate that the latest test, which North Korea claims was an H-bomb, was approximately 17 times as strong as the bomb that devastated the Japanese city of Hiroshima during World War II. Yet as tensions rise, neither Kim nor Trump appears ready to back down or seek a diplomatic solution to the standoff.
  • What Is An H-Bomb?
  • Will North Korea Really Detonate One?
  • How Would It Happen?
  • What Are The Risks?

READ MORE HERE: